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Molecular Characterization and Geological Microenvironment of a Microbial Community Inhabiting Weathered Receding Shale Cliffs

DOI: 10.1007/s00248-010-9730-6 DOI Help

Authors: Charles Cockell (Open University) , David Pybus (Cleveland Potash Ltd) , Karen Olsson (Open University) , Laura Kelly (Open University) , David Petley (Durham University) , Nick Rosser (Durham University) , Kieren Howard (Natural History Museum) , Fred Mosselmans (Diamond Light Source)
Co-authored by industrial partner: No

Type: Journal Paper
Journal: Environmental Microbiology

State: Published (Approved)
Published: August 2010

Abstract: Shales play an important role in many earth system processes including coastal erosion, and they form the foundations of many engineering structures. The geobiology of the interior of pyrite-containing receding shale cliffs on the coast of northeast England was examined. The surface of the weathered shales was characterised by a thin layer of disordered authigenic iron oxyhydroxides and localised acicular, platy and aggregated gypsum, which was characterised by Raman spectroscopy, XAS and SEM. These chemical changes are likely to play an important role in causing rock weakening along fractures at the micron scale, which ultimately lead to coastal retreat at the larger scale. The surface of the shale hosts a novel, low-diversity microbial community. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, with phylotypes closely associating with Methylocella and other members of the γ-subdivision. The second largest phylogenetic group corresponded to Nitrospira. The archaeal 16S rRNA phylotypes were dominated by a single group of sequences that matched phylotypes reported from South African gold mines and possessed ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. Both the phylogenetic and the mineral data show that acidic microenvironments play an important role in shale weathering, but the shale has a higher microbial diversity than previously described pyritic acid mine drainage sites. The presence of a potentially biogeochemically active microbial population on the rock surface suggests that microorganisms may contribute to early events of shale degradation and coastal erosion.

Subject Areas: Environment


Instruments: I18-Microfocus Spectroscopy