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BRAIN IRON AND MRI IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE, PARKINSON'S DISEASE, AND MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY

DOI: 10.1002/ajh.23453 DOI Help

Authors: Joanna Collingwood (Warwick University) , Mary Finnegan (University of Warwick)
Co-authored by industrial partner: No

Type: Journal Paper
Journal: American Journal Of Hematology , VOL 88 , PAGES E45

State: Published (Approved)
Published: May 2013
Diamond Proposal Number(s): 7450 , 7453

Abstract: Iron from multiple brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is compared with healthy controls. Altered iron regulation has been observed in various forms in many neurodegenerative disorders; its contribution to disease progression remains an active topic of research. Dysregulation of metal elements besides iron is implicated in various pathological processes, but tracemetals analysis in human brain almost invariably occurs post-mortem. Iron is unusual; it holds particular scope for clinical detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Iron’s influence on certain MRI parameters is well-demonstrated, but clinical attribution of MRI signal to iron requires validation in context. By testing relationships between regional brain iron in human tissue, and relevant MRI parameters, we are exploring the potential to differentiate between neurodegenerative disorders on the basis of brain iron status. Some iron changes arguably precede the extensive degeneration that is clinically observed in later stages of disease.

Subject Areas: Medicine


Instruments: I18-Microfocus Spectroscopy