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Microbial Engineering of Nanoheterostructures: Biological Synthesis of a Magnetically Recoverable Palladium Nanocatalyst

DOI: 10.1021/nn9017944 DOI Help

Authors: Vicky Coker (University of Manchester) , James A. Bennett (School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham) , Neil Telling (Keele University) , Torsten Henkel (School of Earth, Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences and Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, University of Manchester) , John Charnock (University of Manchester) , Gerrit Van Der Laan (Diamond Light Source) , Richard Pattrick (University of Manchester) , Carolyn Pearce (University of Manchester) , Richard S. Cutting (School of Earth, Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences and Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, University of Manchester) , Ian J. Shannon (School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham) , Joe Wood (School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham) , Elke Arenholz (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) , Ian C. Lyon (School of Earth, Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences and Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, University of Manchester) , Jon Lloyd (University of Manchester)
Co-authored by industrial partner: No

Type: Journal Paper
Journal: Acs Nano , VOL 4 (5) , PAGES 2577-2584

State: Published (Approved)
Published: January 2010

Abstract: Precious metals supported on ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses in catalysis. However, fabrication using synthetic methods results in potentially high environmental and economic costs. Here we show a novel biotechnological route for the synthesis of a heterogeneous catalyst consisting of reactive palladium nanoparticles arrayed on a nanoscale biomagnetite support. The magnetic support was synthesized at ambient temperature by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens, and facilitated ease of recovery of the catalyst with superior performance due to reduced agglomeration (versus conventional colloidal Pd nanoparticles). Surface arrays of palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the nanomagnetite using a simple one-step method without the need to modify the biomineral surface, most likely due to an organic coating priming the surface for Pd adsorption, which was produced by the bacterial culture during the formation of the nanoparticles. A combination of EXAFS and XPS showed the Pd nanoparticles on the magnetite to be predominantly metallic in nature. The Pd biomagnetite was tested for catalytic activity in the Heck reaction coupling iodobenzene to ethyl acrylate or styrene. Rates of reaction were equal to or superior to those obtained with an equimolar amount of a commercial colloidal palladium catalyst, and near complete conversion to ethyl cinnamate or stilbene was achieved within 90 and 180 min, respectively.

Subject Areas: Environment


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