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Evolution of the magnetic excitations in NaOsO 3 through its metal-insulator transition

DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.227203 DOI Help

Authors: J. G. Vale (University College London; École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)) , S. Calder (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) , C. Donnerer (University College London) , D. Pincini (University College London; Diamond Light Source) , Y. Shi (Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; National Institute for Materials Science) , Y. Tsujimoto (National Institute for Materials Science) , K. Yamaura (National Institute for Materials Science; Hokkaido University) , M. Moretti Sala (ESRF, The European Synchrotron) , J. Van Den Brink (Institute for Theoretical Solid State Physics, IFW Dresden) , A. D. Christianson (Oak Ridge National Laboratory; University of Tennessee) , D. F. Mcmorrow (University College London)
Co-authored by industrial partner: No

Type: Journal Paper
Journal: Physical Review Letters , VOL 120

State: Published (Approved)
Published: May 2018

Abstract: The temperature dependence of the excitation spectrum in NaOsO3 through its metal-to-insulator transition (MIT) at 410 K has been investigated using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Os L3 edge. High-resolution (ΔE∼56  meV) measurements show that the well-defined, low-energy magnons in the insulating state weaken and dampen upon approaching the metallic state. Concomitantly, a broad continuum of excitations develops which is well described by the magnetic fluctuations of a nearly antiferromagnetic Fermi liquid. By revealing the continuous evolution of the magnetic quasiparticle spectrum as it changes its character from itinerant to localized, our results provide unprecedented insight into the nature of the MIT in NaOsO3.

Keywords: Antiferromagnetism; Magnetic phase transitions; Metal-insulator transition; Spin waves; Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

Subject Areas: Materials, Physics

Synchrotron: Spallation Neutron Source